Blog

  • Mar 06 2017

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    Intestinal Parasites- Worms and more!

    Dr. Kim Quinn                                                                                                                                                   March 2017 Ever wondered the types of intestinal parasites your pets pick up?  Or why we recommend yearly fecal testing to look for parasites? It is because your pet can pick up parasites fairly easily, and some of them cause severe illness, and/or can be transmitted to people! Let’s explore! Roundworms The most common intestinal parasite in puppies and kittens, it is often passed from the mother animal to its offspring while they are in the uteris, via milk ingestion, or through exposure to an infected animal’s feces.  Also, our pets can pick up this…

  • Feb 08 2017

    Appropriate Treats for Pets

    February 2017                                                                                          Dr. Kim Quinn The world is our oyster for foods and treats!  There is also a plethora of information regarding toxic foods for us humans, so we are less likely to ingest odd things.  It isn’t the same way for dogs and cats as for us humans, we have to be a bit more careful with them.  So many different toxins exist for our pets, which are not an issue for us.  Everyone knows about chocolate, grapes and raisins, but some of the lesser known toxins such as macadamia nuts and walnuts, caffeine, fatty foods being predisposed…

  • Jan 12 2017

    Cold Weather Safety

    January 2017                                                            Dr. Kim Quinn It’s cold out there!  Just as in the heat of summer, we do need to take care of our pets in the cold of winter- protect them from the elements.  Each animal’s weather tolerance is different, depending on fat stores, fur coat, and other issues such as arthritis which can worsen with cold weather.  Animals with poor circulation due to other underlying issues such as kidney disease, Cushing’s disease, diabetes, etc., can also reduce a pet’s cold tolerance. Walking Safety If it is too cold outside for you, it’s too cold outside for them.  Have…

  • Dec 02 2016

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    Canine Vaccines

    Dogs have a range of different vaccines which we administer, based on their likelihood of exposure due to their lifestyle. What are these vaccines and why do we recommend protection?  Vaccines work by stimulating the immune system to form antibodies, essentially soldiers whose job is to seek out viruses/bacteria and destroy them before they produce ill effects or to reduce disease severity and duration.       Distemper Combination Vaccine (DA2PP) This vaccine has a combination of four different viruses: Distemper Distemper is virus which attacks many different areas of the body- often the respiratory tract is first, but vomiting/diarrhea,…

  • Nov 02 2016

    Animal Wellness Bloodwork

    Medicine is an adapting science- as it evolves, we similarly evolve to provide better care.  “Fire Engine” medicine was the norm years ago, only seeing the doctor when there was an emergency.  Now, we strive to practice preventative medicine- identifying and treating issues before they cause major health abnormalities. The old adage, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is of the upmost truth and importance. It is for this reason that human doctors perform yearly bloodwork, even when we are young and healthy.  At our Veterinary clinic, we are no different.  Before any anaesthetic procedure we…

  • Oct 03 2016

    Feline Vaccines

    By: Kimberley Quinn                                                                           October, 2016 Most owned cats are indoor only, reducing their risk of exposure to viruses from other cats which can make them ill.  Even indoor cats can be at risk, thus keeping their vaccines up-to-date is an excellent idea! Indoor cats can try to escape, or can be nose-to-nose with a feral cat through a screened window or door.  Interestingly, many cats are exposed to viruses from their mother cat around the time of birth.  During their lives, exposure may change.  Areas of higher exposure would include: being in a shelter, going outdoors, living in a multi-cat…

  • Aug 29 2016

    Disaster Preparedness

    Tornadoes and other natural disasters remind us that we can never be too prepared for an incident.  During the ice storm a few years ago, I remember my mother filling up jars of water and stocking the basement with canned goods ‘just-in-case’.  After this week’s tornados, getting similarly prepared is an excellent idea.  But, what can we do for our pets? Make a pet first-aid kit and keep it in a location known to the entire family. Some items to keep in the kit include: Veterinary records, extra pet medications, photos of your pets, phone number and directions to the…

  • Jun 13 2016

    Ear Infections

    Many pets have had an ear infection at some point in their lives.  Some pets seem to have chronic issues with their ears, which can range from uncomfortable to unbearable.  While ear infections are most common in the spring and fall months, they can occur at any time of the year.  It is also one of the most common reasons for pets to be brought into the clinic! What does an ear infection look like? The most common ear infection is the red inflamed ear with brown discharge.  Infected ears can also contain yellow or black discharge, they may not…

  • May 26 2016

    Ticks- What can I do about them?!

    My first experience with a tick was seeing something small and oval, like a small brown pebble, on my dog’s ear.  On further inspection, I noticed the round bodied thing had lots of legs! Relatives of the spider, adult ticks also have eight legs on the underside of their body.  Depending on the lifestage of the tick, and whether it has had a meal, they can vary in size from a few millimeters to up to 1.0cm! The tick lifecycle depends on which species of tick we are discussing.  The most common tick in this area is the American Dog…

  • May 05 2016

    Nails! How do I trim those? And what if it is broken?!

    Written by: Dr. Kim Quinn We all have these lovely, keratin-based structures- but dog and cat nails are different from ours.  Here are some of the top questions about pet nails we receive on a daily basis. How often should I trim my pet’s nails? With cats and dogs, trim their claws about once monthly.  Depending on what they do in a day, some animals will wear their claws down more or less quickly, thus altering how often they need those claws trimmed. Of course, cut the white portion of the nails, don’t trim back into the blood vessel (otherwise…